Downturn implications and a reconvergence of rates

09.07.2019

Download

Jenna Barnard, Co-Head of Strategic Fixed Income, explores the options for meaningful policy easing by developed market central banks in the face of the current downturn in global activity.

Summary points:

  • The global manufacturing downturn has recently entered its fourteenth consecutive month; but examining the downturn through the prism of the US may leave investors with too sanguine a view.
  • While policy options are mostly hamstrung in Japan, Europe has ample room to buy more corporate bonds. Meanwhile, the US and Australia have the means for further conventional easing.
  • In our view, the next big move in developed bond markets will ultimately see interest rates reconverge, with the US moving down towards the rest.


The global manufacturing downturn has recently entered its fourteenth consecutive month of decline as measured by the Global Manufacturing PMI. The downturn, which emanated in Asia, has had a severe knock-on effects on economies like Germany, which have created an economic model heavily interconnected with an emergent China in recent decades. In other countries, such as Australia, it has coincided with a housing and consumer downturn, whose rhythm has been out of step with the slow consumer deleveraging in the rest of the developed world.

The result of such a prolonged period of weak global trade and export growth is that many central banks have moved on from the ‘denial’ phase and are actively discussing, and in some cases pursuing, monetary easing (Australia and New Zealand).

An unusual cycle with the Fed out of the driving seat
Looking at this global growth downturn through the prism of the US economy is fraught with danger, as investors are likely to come away with too sanguine a view. We have said in the past that the US was not the source of this slowdown (unlike in 2000 and 2007) and it remains a relatively insular economy — US exports form approximately 15% of its GDP versus 50% in Germany and 30% in the UK.

This is an unusual cycle where other central banks and the bond markets in the developed world are now conducting the mood music, which the US Federal Reserve (Fed) is increasingly reactive to. This note explores the policy options in various countries to enact meaningful policy easing.

As we sit near or at the lower bound for interest rates, the ability to act is a new question for investors who previously focused on the willingness to act.

Central banks that have not done QE yet…
…a relatively sparse list of central banks in the developed world, but one that includes both Australia and Canada. Notably, Australia has only cut rates since 2011. With interest rates currently sitting at a historic low of 1.25% and expected to fall to at least 1%, this bank only begun discussing quantitative easing (QE) as a policy tool in December 2018. In a speech given by Guy Debelle, Deputy Governor, he stated that “QE is a policy option in Australia, should it be required. There are less government bonds here, which may make QE more effective. But most of the traction in terms of borrowing rates in Australia is at the short end of the curve rather than the longer end of the curve, which might reduce the effectiveness of QE.”

In our view, it was no coincidence that the foreign currency pairing of AUDJPY (Australian dollar versus the Japanese yen) experienced a 7% flash crash in a few hours in early January 2019, following an eight percent depreciation in the month prior to this move. This currency pairing perfectly encapsulates the central bank with the most (Australia), and the one with the least (Japan), scope for monetary policy easing. 

Evolving reaction function at the Fed
The Fed signalled in early 2019 that rates had peaked but appears to be in an intellectual transition regarding the policy framework and the ability of the US economy to remain immune from the global industrial downturn.

In this context, there is renewed focus on the structural undershooting of inflation since 2009. Notably, this is a very different spin from the comparisons to 1967 (inflation breakout risk) provided by Fed Chair Powell in the summer of 2018. Here, under the guidance of Vice Chair, Clarida, there is renewed focus on the international experience of low inflation and interest rates.

The recent signalling of a readiness to cut interest rates appears logical. The final 50 basis points of hikes in October and December 2018 into pronounced weakness in rates-sensitive sectors such as housing and autos, was clearly a mistake. Any deterioration in the employment market from here will likely engender an even stronger reaction. It is worth remembering that ‘surprising’ in a rate cutting cycle is admirable (unlike in a rate hiking cycle).

ECB’s Draghi (and board) retiring soon plus hamstrung policy options in Japan
This is where it gets really interesting. First, because the starting point is not one that you would choose as a policymaker (negative interest rates plus government bond purchases close to their legal and technical limit), and second, because in Europe President Draghi and significant members of the board are due to retire in 2019.

Starting with the European Central Bank (ECB), Mario Draghi has been clear that he believes the bank has room in all of its policy levers — including rate cuts into even more negative territory. It is worth noting that at -0.4% deposit rate the only relevant comparable is Switzerland with a -0.75% sight deposits rate, even Japan sits at -0.1% (key interest rate).

In our view the most likely meaningful policy loosening is through investment grade corporate bond purchases, which was first announced in March 2016. The ECB owns €178bn (approximately 20%) of the eligible universe of corporate bonds. Its mandate allows purchases of up to 70% (ECB, 31 May 2019). An increase to 40% seems wholly credible and would imply another €200bn of purchases of eligible investment grade corporate bonds.

In the case of Japan, policy options really do look close to exhausted. With close to 50% of the JGB market owned by the central bank, explicit yield curve control (target for 10-year yields), negative interest rates and purchases of equity ETFs for years, it is difficult to find a policy option which could surprise to the upside.

The key constraining factor for the Bank of Japan was the market reaction in January 2016 when it cut interest rates into negative territory. The share price of banks plummeted and its currency moved higher as a result of a risk-off reaction. This effectively tightened financial conditions and illustrated how hamstrung policy options were and still are.

Stopping inflation expectations from sliding into the abyss
In summary, the next big move for bond markets will likely see interest rates in the developed world reconverge. For many years, consensus has argued that this was likely to occur through rates in the rest of the developed world moving up towards US interest rates. We have long disagreed and positioned for continuing divergence between the US and rest of the world viewing many economies as trapped in a lobster pot of low interest rates and quantitative easing.

Short-term rates signalling rate cuts?



Source: Bloomberg, Janus Henderson Investors, as at 18 June 2019
Note: Generic 2-year bond yields

The next big structural move in interest rates and government bond yields should be policy easing from those with ability to do so (ie, the US and Australia). For Europe, a move into private assets (corporate bonds) is likely as the limit of meaningful government bond QE is reached.

This may not be the ‘normalisation’ many hoped for but it is a natural reaction for inflation targeting central banks trying desperately to keep inflation expectations from sliding into a natural abyss,  driven by long-term structural factors over which they have little control.



Die vorstehenden Einschätzungen sind die des Autors zum Zeitpunkt der Veröffentlichung und können von denen anderer Personen/Teams bei Janus Henderson Investors abweichen. Die Bezugnahme auf einzelne Wertpapiere, Fonds, Sektoren oder Indizes in diesem Artikel stellt weder ein Angebot oder eine Aufforderung zu deren Erwerb oder Verkauf dar, noch ist sie Teil eines solchen Angebots oder einer solchen Aufforderung.

Die Wertentwicklung in der Vergangenheit ist kein zuverlässiger Indikator für die künftige Wertentwicklung. Alle Performance-Angaben beinhalten Erträge und Kapitalgewinne bzw. -verluste, aber keine wiederkehrenden Gebühren oder sonstigen Ausgaben des Fonds.

Der Wert einer Anlage und die Einkünfte aus ihr können steigen oder fallen. Es kann daher sein, dass Sie nicht die gesamte investierte Summe zurückerhalten.

Die Informationen in diesem Artikel stellen keine Anlageberatung dar.

Zu Werbezwecken.


Wichtige Informationen

Bitte lesen Sie die folgenden wichtigen Informationen zu den in diesem Artikel genannten Fonds.

Janus Henderson Horizon Strategic Bond Fund

Dieses Dokument ist ausschließlich für professionelle Anleger und nicht für die breite Öffentlichkeit gedacht.

Der Janus Henderson Horizon Fund (der „Fonds”) ist eine in Luxemburg am 30. Mai 1985 errichtete SICAV, die von Henderson Management S.A. verwaltet wird. Ein Antrag auf Zeichnung von Anteilen erfolgt ausschließlich basierend auf den Informationen im Verkaufsprospekt des Fonds (einschließlich aller maßgeblichen begleitenden Dokumente), der Angaben zu den Anlagebeschränkungen enthält. Dieses Dokument ist lediglich als Zusammenfassung gedacht. Potenzielle Anleger müssen vor einer Anlage den Verkaufsprospekt des Fonds sowie die wesentlichen Anlegerinformationen lesen. Der Verkaufsprospekt des Fonds sowie die wesentlichen Anlegerinformationen sind bei Henderson Global Investors Limited in dessen Funktion als Investment-Manager und Vertriebsgesellschaft erhältlich.

Herausgegeben von Janus Henderson Investors. Janus Henderson Investors ist der Name, unter dem Anlageprodukte und -dienstleistungen von Janus Capital International Limited (Registrierungsnummer 3594615), Henderson Global Investors Limited (Registrierungsnummer 906355), Henderson Investment Funds Limited (Registrierungsnummer 2678531), AlphaGen Capital Limited (Registrierungsnummer 962757), Henderson Equity Partners Limited (Registrierungsnummer 2606646) (jeweils in England und Wales mit Sitz in 201 Bishopsgate, London EC2M 3AE eingetragen und durch die Financial Conduct Authority reguliert) und Henderson Management S.A. (Registrierungsnummer B22848 mit Sitz in 2 Rue de Bitbourg, L-1273, Luxemburg, und durch die Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier reguliert) zur Verfügung gestellt werden.

Die Wertentwicklung in der Vergangenheit ist kein zuverlässiger Hinweis auf die künftige Wertentwicklung. In den Angaben zur Wertentwicklung werden Provisionen und Kosten, die bei der Zeichnung und Rückgabe von Anteilen anfallen, nicht berücksichtigt. Der Wert einer Anlage und die Erträge daraus können sowohl fallen als auch steigen, und Anleger erhalten unter Umständen den ursprünglich investierten Betrag nicht vollständig zurück. Annahmen zur Höhe der Steuersätze sowie Steuerbefreiungen hängen von der persönlichen Steuersituation des Anlegers ab und können sich im Zuge einer Änderung dieser Situation bzw. der Gesetze ändern. Bei einer Anlage über einen Drittanbieter empfehlen wir, sich bei diesem direkt über Einzelheiten wie Gebühren, Performance und Geschäftsbedingungen zu erkundigen, da diese je nach Drittanbieter erheblich voneinander abweichen können.

Die Angaben in diesem Dokument sind nicht als Beratung gedacht und sollten nicht als solche verstanden werden. Das vorliegende Dokument ist weder eine Empfehlung noch Teil einer Vereinbarung zum Kauf oder Verkauf eines Anlageprodukts.

Der Fonds ist zum Zweck der Verkaufsförderung im Vereinigten Königreich als Organismus zur gemeinsamen Anlage anerkannt. Potenzielle Anleger aus dem Vereinigten Königreich werden darauf hingewiesen, dass alle – oder die meisten – der durch das Aufsichtssystem des Vereinigten Königreichs gewährten Schutzmaßnahmen auf eine Anlage in den Fonds keine Anwendung finden und dass keine Entschädigung im Rahmen des United Kingdom Financial Services Compensation Scheme gewährt wird.

Der Prospekt des Fonds und die wesentlichen Anlegerinformationen sind in englischer, französischer, deutscher und italienischer Sprache verfügbar. Die Satzung, die Jahres- und Halbjahresberichte stehen in englischer Sprache zur Verfügung. Die wesentlichen Anlegerinformationen sind auch in Spanisch erhältlich. Alle genannten Dokumente können kostenlos bei den lokalen Niederlassungen von Janus Henderson Investors an folgenden Adressen angefordert werden: für Anleger aus dem Vereinigten Königreich, aus Schweden und Skandinavien in 201 Bishopsgate, London, EC2M 3AE, für Anleger aus Italien in Via Dante 14, 20121, Mailand, Italien, und für Anleger aus den Niederlanden in Roemer Visscherstraat 43-45, 1054 EW Amsterdam, Niederlande; bei der Raiffeisen Bank International AG, Am Stadtpark 9, A-1030 Wien, als österreichischer Zahlstelle; bei der BNP Paribas Securities Services, 3, rue d’Antin, F-75002 Paris, als französischer Zahlstelle; bei Marcard, Stein & Co, Ballindamm 36, 20095 Hamburg, als der Informationsstelle des Fonds in Deutschland; bei CACEIS Belgium S.A., Avenue du Port 86 C b320, B-1000 Brüssel, als Finanzdienstleister in Belgien; bei dem spanischen Repräsentanten Allfunds Bank S.A. Estafeta, 6 Complejo Plaza de la Fuente, La Moraleja, Alcobendas 28109 Madrid, dem Repräsentanten in Singapur Janus Henderson Investors (Singapore) Limited, 138 Market Street, #34-03 / 04 CapitaGreen Singapore 048946, beziehungsweise dem Schweizer Repräsentanten BNP Paribas Securities Services, Paris, succursale de Zurich, Selnaustrasse 16, 8002 Zürich, der auch als Zahlstelle in der Schweiz fungiert. RBC Investor Services Trust Hong Kong Limited, eine Tochtergesellschaft des Joint Ventures der Holdinggesellschaft im Vereinigten Königreich, der RBC Investor Services Limited, 51/F Central Plaza, 18 Harbour Road, Wanchai, Hongkong, Tel: +852 2978 5656, ist der Repräsentant des Fonds in Hongkong.

besondere Risiken

  • Der Fonds sollte ausschließlich als eine von mehreren Komponenten eines diversifizierten Anlageportfolios genutzt werden. Anleger sollten den Anteil ihres in diesen Fonds investierten Portfolios sorgfältig prüfen.
  • Der Fonds könnte Geld verlieren, wenn eine Gegenpartei, mit der er Handel treibt, ihren Zahlungsverpflichtungen gegenüber dem Fonds nicht nachkommen kann oder will.
  • Wenn sich die finanzielle Gesundheit des Emittenten einer Anleihe oder eines Geldmarktinstruments verschlechtert oder der Markt glaubt, dass sie sich verschlechtern könnte, kann der Wert der Anleihe oder des Geldmarktinstruments sinken. Dieses Risiko ist umso höher, je niedriger die Bonität der Anleihe ist.
  • Änderungen der Wechselkurse können den Wert Ihrer Investition sowie alle Erträge daraus steigen oder fallen lassen.
  • Wenn der Fonds oder eine bestimmte Anteilsklasse des Fonds eine Reduzierung der Risiken (z. B. Wechselkursschwankungen) anstrebt, können die hierzu dienenden Maßnahmen unwirksam, nicht verfügbar oder nachteilig sein.
  • Wenn die Zinssätze steigen (oder sinken), hat dies unterschiedliche Auswirkungen auf die Kurse verschiedener Wertpapiere. Insbesondere fallen die Anleihekurse im Allgemeinen, wenn die Zinsen steigen. Dieses Risiko ist allgemein umso höher, je länger die Laufzeit einer Anleiheinvestition ist.
  • Die Bewertung eines Wertpapiers oder seine Veräußerung gewünschten Zeitpunkt und Preis kann sich als schwierig erweisen, wodurch das Risiko von Anlageverlusten steigt.

Risikobewertung

Teilen

Wichtige Botschaft